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After I’d come down off the high of our Michelin dinner I thought I’d just look into the humble pea and its origins.

As ever when I want to read about vegetables I tend to turn to Colin Spencer’s brilliant and humbly titled The Vegetable Book. It rates in my top 10 food books of all time, about which I will post one day. I say food books rather than cook books, because it is so much more than a recipe collection. It is, for me at least, the finest kind of food-related writing. A potted history, followed with descriptions of the various varieties of selected vegetables. Interspersed with advice on choosing, nutritional information and original ideas and recipes. It is a superb book.

In amongst the delightful writing Colin likes to drop in a few historical quotes. I particularly like this one is about peas.

According to Colin the French court Louis XIV was besotted by green peas, as Madame de Maintenon wrote in a letter dated 10th May 1696 :  “this subject of peas continues to absorb all others. The anxiety to eat them, the pleasure of having eaten them and the desire to eat them again, are three great matters which have been discussed by our princes for four days past. Some ladies, even after having supped at the Royal table and well supped too, returning to their own homes, at the risk of suffering indigestion will again eat peas before going to bed. It is both a fashion and a madness”

The history of food I think is a fascinating subject. In this day and age of any food, anytime, from anywhere in the world it gives us a glimpe of how things used to be. A time when we couldn’t have anything we wanted, whenever we wanted, and when foods that we take for granted now, like peas, were a novelty.

Strange things can happen when you’re camping in West Wales. Mostly some random cooking (although that’s not always restricted to camping in West Wales as far as I’m concerned!) Not the best, most amazing Cordon Bleu meal. But, good food cooked, where the atmosphere and location are some of the ingredients.

I like cooking away from home with limited resources. At home I can pick up an onion, meat, garlic, spices, potatoes, whatever I like really. And if I run out, I can pop down the road to Asda which is open 24hrs (don’t get me started on that one) When you’re camping, you either have to take everything with you, or buy it there. We took almost nothing with us.

We had with us: Lemons, limes, apples, oil, salt & pepper, a bbq, some applewood smoking chips (as you do) a gas stove and various cooking pots.

Now me being me, I decided we would only buy ingredients that were local and in season (as if resources weren’t restricted enough!) So for dinner we bought: Chicken thighs (2), beetroot (a very fresh bunch with leaves), potatoes (local, new, medium in size), peas (1st of the new English season) a butternut squash (spot the obvious unseasonal ingredient!) and a cauliflower. These ingredients could have gone many ways. For me it said baked beetroot & potatoes, smoked chicken and a pea & cauliflower salad. The vegetables were incredibly fresh. Leaves and stems on the beetroot standing proudly, and the peas the sweetest and freshest I’ve had in ages.

So I sparked up the bbq. Hot coals kept in the middle, potatoes and beetroot around the edge & lid on. If you haven’t ever tried a BBQ with a lid, I can highly recommend it. It’s changed my cooking life! A great outdoor oven, keeping the heat in and giving a lovely smoky flavour, whilst crisping up the food. Pretty easily controllable, and more versatile than you might imagine.

Camping BBQ’d dinner:

  • If you’ve got them, and I do recommend you give them a try, put a couple of handfuls of smoking chips in a container and cover with water.
  • Important to get the bbq hot and put the beetroot and potatoes on first. The beetroot and spuds will take anything from 45mins to 1 1/2 hrs. Planning is everything if you want to eat before the sun goes down when camping!
  • Put a pot of water on to boil and blanch the peas and cauliflower in batches. I like to use as much of the leaves of the cauli as well if I can. When they’re tender drop them into cold water to refresh, stop cooking and keep their colour. Drain.
  • Zest the lemon (I think I used a paring knife and then shredded it best I could!) and add to the peas and cauliflower. Season with olive oil, salt & pepper.
  • The squash can go on the bbq with the other veg now and a fistful of the smoking chips. As you can see, just 1/4 or 1/2 the squash, and obviously drain the chips!
  • Season the chicken thighs with salt, pepper and olive oil. They’ll probably take 1/2 an hr 45mins ish. So put them on about the same time as the squash. They’ll more or less take the same time.
  • Put the lid on the bbq and turn the chicken, preferably only once. You want to keep in all the heat and smoky flavour.
  • Sit back and enjoy a well-earned glass of something cold, downwind!

Smokin! And why you need to be upwind.

I like it when my wife goes to the shops. She comes home with things I might not have bought myself.

Last night it was asparagus and fresh peas. Both English, both very in season. Pleasingly, as the asparagus season is getting later, its prices are mercifully coming down. The peas are the first we’ve had this year, very lovely and exciting. The psb (purple sprouting broccoli) is coming to the end of its season (sadly). This year I decided I was going to try to make myself sick of it. It’s one of our wonderful seasonal treats, and one I don’t eat enough of. We had some that needed using up, and it felt right to put them all together as a salad enjoyed in the warmth of our early evening garden.

The barbeque was lit and (for me at least) there was much anticipation. But then that’s often the case with me and BBQs generally. Sausages (of course) and a chicken breast (spiced with cumin, coriander & garlic)  that needed using up from the freezer, went on the literally smoking-hot grill.

A fresh, (and simple) early summer salad:

1 Bunch of asparagus

3 big handfuls of fresh peas, shelled

Purple sprouting broccoli, a small handful

Fresh herbs, 1-2 tbsp, chopped. Whatever you have to hand, but soft for preference. I used mint, lemon balm, marjoram & parsley.

Sherry vinegar (or balsamic if you don’t have it) a splash

Extra virgin olive oil, a big lug

  • Put a large pan of lightly salted water on to boil.
  • Snap the asparagus where it wants to, of its woody ends.
  • One by one, blanch each of the vegetables for 3 minutes in the boiling water. Let the water come back to the boil before you put the next in. Refresh them as you take them out, in cold water.
  • Drain and dress with the oil, salt & pepper.
  • If you happen to have a BBQ lit now’s the time to grill the asparagus. It gives a lovely colour and smoky flavour, that lends itself very well to the pointy green spears.
  • Cut the asparagus into 1-2 inch lengths, on the angle looks good.
  • Mix everything together with remaining ingredients & serve.

To be honest I would have liked more mint & parsley in the salad,as they work so well with the peas. And I meant to put some chive flowers in there too, but I forgot.

Other good things to BBQ;

  • Potatoes, cut very thick, boiled until just tender in their skins, drained & dressed with oil, salt & pepper.
  • Onions, red or white, treated the same way as the spuds.

Yum

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